Risk and resilience photo entry: Greg Gullette

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Photo by Greg Gullette

Description: Over the past few years I have examined rural-urban migration and the effects of urban expansion on households’ livelihoods.  This includes social prejudices often experienced among ‘rural’ migrants relocated to urban centers in Thailand who often find work in informal economies or street stall vending, as well as the ways in which agrarian households located on the fringes of Bangkok engage in similar forms of labor to manage the social, economic, and environmental effects of urbanization.  As demonstrated in this photo taken at sunset in Thailand, the fields that anthropologists work within are increasingly complex and present notable challenges for research that seeks to understand the expansive and interconnected natures of urban growth, social and demographic change, livelihood adjustments, and environmental effects.

Risk and resilience photo entry: Leann Leiter

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Photo credit: Leann Leiter, MA in Sustainable Communities candidate, Northern Arizona University

Title: Everyday Readiness

Description: I am conducting a participatory research study in the small village in Northern Arizona where I live, which has recently been threatened by wildfires and experienced several minor earthquakes. I have asked my neighbors to contemplate what “disaster” means to them, and photo-document things in and around their households that represent their vulnerability or resilience in the face of potential disaster. I decided to join them in the process. The items in this image are the partial contents of what I call my “Apoco-pac,” a bag I keep packed at all times in case of emergency or evacuation. The items – ranging from cordage to a compass – help me feel prepared for the unknown on an everyday basis.

New REA volume: Climate change, Culture and Economics

We are delighted to announce the publication of Climate Change, Culture, and Economics edited by Donald C. Wood, Akita University. This is volume 35 in the Research in Economic Anthropology series, which is sponsored by the Society for Economic Anthropology. This special volume of REA facilitates readers to better understand the ways in which people around the world have adapted (or failed to adapt) culturally to changing economic conditions caused by climate change. It focuses on specific situations in particular locations, showcasing (and confirming) the strength and value of intensive ethnographic or archaeological investigation.

SEA members will be entitled to a 40% discount on this volume six months following publication, in March 2016. The previous volume, Production, Consumption, Business and the Economy: Structural Ideals and Moral Realities (Volume 34), is now available at a 40% discount. To redeem this offer go to http://books.emeraldinsight.com/offer/ and enter the code SEA-REA.

More information here.

Abstract deadline extended for SEA meeting to Jan 18

Abstracts for the 2016 SEA conference are due Jan 18 to give those just coming back from break time to submit – please remember to submit them following the instructions below. Thanks, and see you in Athens!
HOW TO:
You might think that clicking on “Spring Meetings” in the americananthro.org website would do it, but this link just takes you to a description of the Spring meetings.
Instead, to register/submit your abstract, go to americananthro.org, then log on with your AAA id and password.  Once you are logged in, click on meeting registration on the left-hand side.  Then look for our meeting and click register.
The reason our deadline is Jan 11 rather than later is because we want to let participants know if their abstract was accepted in sufficient time so that people may secure travel funding.
Here is a Revised Call for Papers with more information about our keynote speaker, Dr. Kathleen Galvin, and lodging.
To further inspire risky and resilient thoughts, below are the fine entries we have received from the Photo Contest:
M0387BT bad cornbridge wash outdealing with riskIMG_0260BCAM01072BColonia popular IC

Abstracts for SEA meeting are due today!

Abstracts for the 2016 SEA conference are due today – please remember to submit them following the instructions below. Thanks, and see you in Athens!

HOW TO:
You might think that clicking on “Spring Meetings” in the americananthro.org website would do it, but this link just takes you to a description of the Spring meetings.

Instead, to register/submit your abstract, go to americananthro.org, then log on with your AAA id and password.  Once you are logged in, click on meeting registration on the left-hand side.  Then look for our meeting and click register.

The reason our deadline is Jan 11 rather than later is because we want to let participants know if their abstract was accepted in sufficient time so that people may secure travel funding.

Here is a Revised Call for Papers with more information about our keynote speaker, Dr. Kathleen Galvin, and lodging.

To further inspire risky and resilient thoughts, below are the fine entries we have received from the Photo Contest:
M0387BT bad corn bridge wash out dealing with risk IMG_0260B CAM01072B Colonia popular IC